Tag Archives: silicone

End of Year Show: Preperation

9 Jun

Over the past week I have been working on my end of year show piece. I’m working in a group with some of the really great girls in my year so I’m excited to see the final results on Thursday.

My role within the group was to design the facial makeup and create the gill and spine prosthetics – I also collaborated with Shona on some of the details of her body-paint role. We all discussed what each of us had worked on and brought our ideas together to create a final plan we were all happy with, updating each other regularly with our progress on our Facebook group.

Today I am in Uni, creating the PlasSil moulds. I was originally going to create 3D transfers using Pro-bondo however I have realised this won’t really work as I need to use the moulds to make several pieces. So I’m going to use liquid latex. I hate using liquid latex for prosthetics; alas, needs must. I’ve been speaking to Grace McComisky about how she creates her pieces as I need to work on more substantial materials for my appliances! (PS. Anyone want to give me some make-up work so I can earn the money to BUY these materials – much appreciate 😉 )

Onwards!

First Layer of PlatSil

First Layer of PlatSil

 

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Sue Day: Silicone Painting & Hair Punching Lesson

12 Nov

Today we had a session with Sue Day, who works at Madame Tussaud’s. We have been working with Martin from Madame Tussaud’s for a few weeks now on life casting, however Sue came in to teach us about painting silicone and hair punching.

Using a ready made silicone piece (originally of David Beckham), we practiced colouring. We used a silicone/turps/oil paint mix, creating the consistency and colours ourselves.

I wanted to work with a “flesh” coloured piece so I could create a more realistic look, but instead was given a opaque red-pink piece. I instantly gave it  green wash to try combat the horrible colour; though not knowing yet how to use the paint, I did leave a few green dots – oops. Using the flicking technique with a stiff brush and light washes with a small brush, I built up layers of colour to create a human skin pattern, paying attention to where certain colours would lie in the skin, such as more blues for the thin eye skins, where veins would show through.

Colour Build

Colour Build

She then showed us how to punch hair, the actual punching is pretty easy.

All you need is a normal needle; cut the end off the eye so you have a fork-like implement, then mount this in a needle grip handle (the same one used for a knotting needle). Next push the hair into the silicone, the key is the angle and direction. You need to study how the hair grows out of the skin to ensure a realistic growth pattern,  keeping the needle very horizontal if you want the hair to lie on the skin surface, vertical if pushing away from the body.

We were meant to use curled hair (curled by wrapping straight hair around a chopstick and boiling), however I wanted to create old man eyebrows, which often are quite messy and stick out a lot, so I used straight human hair.

Initial piece, next to the finished piece.

Initial piece, next to the finished piece.

Next stage is colouring and punching our own silicone piece… stay tuned!

Life Casting – Negative Creating & Silicone Running

11 Nov

Today I went into uni to catch up with my SFX work, having been off for work experience. Today I created my negative over the sculpted clay, to finish my mould and run my silicone piece.

Below you can see my finished sculpt, the top clay half is my primary piece, the lower half is a back up piece incase anything goes wrong with the top part.

To create the negative mould, we carried out the same steps as doing the initial life cast, only this time, we already have the facial mould to use. Check back through my earlier SFX posts to find more in depth details about this procedure, heres a quick run through –

1. Create the clay/modrock wall and cover the interior in Vaseline.

2. Fill with plaster, using a double skrim layer for support.

Clay/Modrock Wall

Clay/Modrock Wall

Creating the Plaster Negative

Creating the Plaster Negative

3. Allow to set for approximately 15min, then break open. remove all clay and particles from the interior to ensure the shape of the silicone run is not altered.

Plaster Negative

Plaster Negative

4. Once this has been done, we are ready to run! Place the mould on a stable horizontal surface, and pour in the silicone. Place the first part of the mould (the positive side) within the negative. Those holes we drilled earlier will help get positive to negative positioning correct. Silicone will run out the sides so watch out. Place a small dab of the silicone on top of the mould to help determine if the silicone has set.

Time to pour!

Time to pour!

Running the Silcone

Running the Silicone

5. After about 45min, it’s time to break open! You’ll have to come back next week to see the silicone piece!

Breaking Open!

Breaking Open!

SFX: Face Casting – Part 1

24 Sep

In our first semester of our second year, we are finally getting to work on some casting, moulding and sculpting!

Today we had our first lesson,  creating two part silicone-plaster face casts and  then using the casts we have made to form plaster models on which we can sculpt our pieces of work. I’ve got to say, I really don’t like having my face covered in the silicone – but art can come at a cost!

CREATING THE FACE CAST

To do this we used:

  • 2x Plastic mixing bowls
  • Blunt wooden tool
  • Cheap brush for rubber application (will be thrown away after)
  • Mouldlife life form silicone rubber (Part A)
  • Mouldlife life form silicone rubber (Part B)
  • Mod Rock bandages
  • Plastic cover for model
  • Vaseline
  • Makeup pencil to draw on the model
  • 2x Plastic spatula

Method:

  1. Remove any makeup and piercings possible, if the subject has a beard or long hair on the face this will need to be removed. Any shorter hair such as long stubble, eyelashes and eyebrows can be vaselined down. Wrap model in the plastic sheet to protect their clothing. Assure the model that if at any time they need to stop the process, the whole piece can be removed by simply peeling it from the face.
  2. Using the makeup pencil, dot around the area that will need to be covered.
  3. Mix life form part A and B in equal parts using a spatula.
  4. Lean the model’s head slightly backwards to discourage the silicone from dragging the face downwards and roll the mixture smoothly across the face, starting from the forehead and working downwards. DO NOT cover the nostrils as this is how the model will breath, throughout this process ensure the model is comfortable (ad they cannot speak use a thumbs up or down signal).
  5. Once the mixture has been applied and is at least tacky, apply the modrock bandage, folding the bandage twice to give four layers of support. Ensure warm water is used to speed the developing process. Cover the silicone, ensuring to rub the modrock into the contours. Use a final piece of modrock length to wrap around the outer edge of the application to keep it together.
  6. This entire process should take 10-15min, after this amount of time the mod rock and silicone should be dry. The model should blow outward and move their face to disrupt the suction that is keeping the silicone on the skin. Using a blunt wooden tool, peel away at any visible silicone edges; the two part mould will come away easily.
Me with some silicone rubber and plaster on my face.

Me with some silicone rubber and plaster on my face.
As you can see, i also have a very sexy hairstyle going on here!

Two part silicone rubber-plaster fast cast.

Two part silicone rubber-plaster fast cast.

Stella's cast of my face.

Stella’s cast of my face.

My cast of Stella's face!

My cast of Stella’s face!

CREATING THE PLASTER MODELS

To do this we used:

  • 1x Plastic mixing bowl
  • Brush (this can be washed out and re-used)
  • Crystacal plaster
  • Cold water
  • Skrim
  • Wooden board
  • Modelling Clay

Method:

  1. Place the face cast onto the wooden board and use the clay on the outside (plaster side) of the mask to cover up any cavities, such as the nostril holes. Then use two sausage shaped clay pieces to hold the face cast in position, level and ready for plaster to be used inside the cast.
  2. Using Vaseline, create a barrier between any of the plaster inside the cast that is not covered, to ensure that the plaster model can be removed once dry.
  3. Create the plaster mix by starting off with one cup of water and slowly adding the plaster, allowing the plaster to soak into the water before mixing, this should be done outside un in a mechanically ventilated area to insure no inhalation. Once all the plaster has socked in it needs to be mixed up and for this part the constancy should be that of buttercream.
  4. Paint this plaster mixture into the mould, ensuring all the silicone rubber is covered.
  5. once this has dried slightly, spray with water, add another layer of more watery plaster and apply a double layer of skrim. cover this with another layer of the watery plaster – no skrim should be seen. Allow this to set for 30-45min.
Covering the holes!

Covering the holes!

Me painting my cast.

Me painting my cast.
PS. This is what my hair looks like if I don’t wash or brush it 😉

This bit requires some patience as the plastic doesn't like to stick to the silicone...

This bit requires some patience as the plaster doesn’t like to stick to the silicone…

Next week we shall be removing our models… check back for more info then! 😀