Tag Archives: hand

Applying and Colouring a Foam Latex Piece.

13 May

Today I completed the final step of my fiberglass mould/foam latex piece process.

Having completed my hand and left it to set, I returned to apply it. Despite being stretched over the mould is did shrink slightly, however not too much that it couldn’t still be applied.

Being short on time and seeing as the hand had been cast from my own, I decided to just apply it to myself.  Unfortunately I’m right handed, and the piece was on my right hand; so I’d given myself a challenge.

I covered the area of my hand that would be touching the prosthetic in pros-aide, and then applied pros-aide to the piece. Once they had both become clear and tacky, I gently started from my finger tips and stretched the piece slowly over my hand. It stuck perfectly. As the edges were slightly too thick, I used pro-bondo (a thickened pros-aide) to smooth down and blend out the edges.

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Once I had done this I had two colouring options. A) Illustrator (alcohol based paint) or, B) Pax paint (equal parts of pros-aide and acrylic paint). Having had more practice with the illustrator i decided to go for this – I couldn’t seem to mix the Pax to the colour I wanted. I layered up my illustrator colour with a stiff brush, spraying the colour across my hand, I then used a thin brush to accent the shadow and highlight around my circular edges.

Overall, I think I did okay to say I was painting with my left hand only, however I think  the colour had merged a lot and was not quite as bright and inky looking as I wanted – however it does correspond to my initial design.

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Plastaline Sculpting on Fiberglass/Running Foam Latex

8 Apr

Having been to Russia, I have been racing to catch up with my work so I can join the third years in running foam latex.

Well, I made it!

When running foam latex you need to consider the room humidity along with temperature, luckily on this day it was seemingly optimal. We collected out products and got to work!

SCULPTING ON FIBERGLASS

I actually have misplaced the images for sculpting on fiberglass, so the wonderful Leanne Marsh has lent be hers. Sculpting on fiberglass is literally the same as sculpting on the plaster (see past blog post). However we cannot use plaster for foam latex as when cooking it in the over, the plaster will crack and break.

Once we have finished our sculpt, we need to use a moisture seal spray, followed by three layers of release agent spray – leaving 10minutes in between each layer so it can dry. Once this has been completed we can start out fiberglass process again (see previous post for more detail), only this time we need a add an extra layer. Layering is as follows:

  • 1x Moisture Sealant
  • 3x Release Agent
  • 1x Gel Coat
  • 1x Fiberglass Tissue
  • 2x Fiberglass Matt
Image by Leanne Marsh

Image by Leanne Marsh

Image by Leanne Marsh

Image by Leanne Marsh

Image by Leanne Marsh

Image by Leanne Marsh

Once this is all dry and fully set over 24-48hours, we need to smooth down the edges. Once this has been done, we crack open the mould and clean it out using a sculpt tool & brush, along with some lighter fluid and a good amount of elbow grease. Now it’s time to get running!

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RUNNING FOAM LATEX

YOU WILL NEED

  • Base Agent
  • Foam Latex Agent
  • Gelling Agent
  • Curing Agent
  • Colour (we used an fleshy acrylic colour)
  • Electronic Mixer
  • Spatula
  • Fiberglass Core & Negative
  • Fiberglass Oven
  • Bolts & Screws for holes drilled into mould

METHOD

  1. Add base agent to mixing bowl, measure out required amounts of foam and curing agent.

  2. Add the curing and foam agent along with the required amount of colour (in this case it was a large pea sized amount), then set the speed to high.
  3. When the head runner calls, change the speed to low, then measure out and add the gelling agent.
  4. Once this has all been mixed together and the head runner calls, stir manually with a spatula for several minutes before adding to the fiberglass moulds. Put the two half moulds together and secure with the bolts. This then needs to go in the oven.
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  5. Once your piece is out of the oven, allow to cool and then remove the bolts. Slowly take out your piece. As it will be covered in ammonia, it needs to be washed several times in warm soapy water to cleanse it.

    My Squid-Woman Hand

    My Squid-Woman Hand

I was really happy with how mine turned out. No rips, bubbles – nothing! and the foam latex off went off brilliantly.

This was just a taster session and we will be studying foam latex more in the third year. I have further details on this process, so please message me if you would like to know more!

Creating a Silicone/Fiberglass Mould

2 Apr

STEP ONE – CREATING THE NEGATIVE

Step one was very similar to step two: once I has bedded in my hand, added the wall and then poured the silicone into the mould I allowed it to set. Once it has set I removed the clay walls and wiped down the silicone.

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I then added a gel layer, followed by the two fiberglass layers. We shall talk through these processes in Step Two.100_4701

STEP TWO – CREATING THE POSITIVE.

YOU WILL NEED

  • PPE
  • Gel Coat
  • Resin
  • Catalyst
  • Fiberglass strands
  • Small square fiberglass sheets
  • Covered board
  • Clay (to stabilise mould)
  • 2x Paper cups (plastic will melt)
  • 2x Wooden mixing sticks
  • 2x Disposable brushes

METHOD

  1. Remove hand and clay from inside the Fiberglass/Silicone Negative – use water to wet the clay. You may need to remove the Outer Fiberglass shell to enable the silicone to be peeled away from the hand. Clean out the silicone mould – then sturdy horizontally with clay pieces.
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  2. Mix together the gel coat and catalyst, ensuring through mixing. Coat the silicone in this with a disposable brush, ensuring there are no bubbles being trapped in the mould. This should only be a coating, not a full layer. Make sue edges are neat and all areas are covered. Then add fiberglass stands to strengthen this and ensure the fiberglass mat fuses properly.100_4711
  3. We then add the first fiberglass matt layer. After an hour, once it has “gone green” we cut the excess away and apply our second fiberglass matt layer (as second image). Once this has dried, we have our fiberglass positive and we are ready to start sculpting!

Creating a Plastaline Sculpt for Sponged Liquid Latex

31 Mar

Creating a plastiline sculpt for sponging latex layers onto, is quite easy as a huge amount of detail is not needed due to the top layer being what will be on show to the viewer – not the detailed under layer. However, it is important to ensure strong definition to allow the shape of the sculpt to show though. Below is a quick explanation of sculpting onto a plaster cast using plastaline.

YOU WILL NEED

  • Plastaline
  • Your Plaster Cast
  • Vaseline & Brush
  • A selection of Sculpting Tools
  • Liquid Latex
  • A Hair Dryer
  • Talcum Powder &  Brush

METHOD

  1. In order to create the sculpt, I found it was first best to create a smooth and even thin second skin for my hand in the area I would be wanting to create my sculpt – this would enable me to create small, smooth edges with my latex. I did this using plastaline, vaseline and a range of sculpt tools a long with a small paintbrush for the vaseline.
  2. 1080729_10152388398892664_1618850967_nNext, I created my plastaline sculpt, using small pieces of the clay to create shapes as per my designs, blending them into my second skin.
  3. I then vaselined my whole piece, to ensure the following liquid latex layers would not stick to my piece.
  4. Once my sculpt was completed and sealed, I added liquid latex layer by layer – using a hair-dryer in between, on a cool setting so as to not melt my plastaline and alter the sculpt shape.photo 2 (2)photo 1 (2)
  5. Having completed 7 layers of latex, leaving thinner areas around the edges, I peeled away my latex skin, powdering both the surface and underneath so they did not stick to one another.

    This image was taken 2 weeks after being produced.. it has gone hard and darker orange! I'm guessing the latex is deteriorating.

    Pre-colouring/application

The above image was taken 2 weeks after being produced… it has gone hard and darker orange! I’m guessing the latex is deteriorating. I am shooting my piece this weekend so I will just need to perhaps alter my brief from “aged skinny hand” to “fantasy aged skin hand” unless I can colour correct it slightly.

I tried using this method with cap plastic, as cap plastic blends out much better than latex. This didn’t work – not even after moisture and release sealing my sculpt.

photo 1 (1)

Failed Cap Plastic Experiement

Failed Cap Plastic Experiement

Heres a shot of my ear sculpt so far, that I have been creating using the same method. This piece has been produced to match my foam latex hand for my final SFX piece.

Photo on 2014-04-09 at 13.31 #2

Alginate Casting

11 Mar

Over the past couple of weeks I have been creating a plaster cast of my own hand, in order to then transform it into a fibreglass core, ready for sculpting onto for my final special effects project.

ALGINATE CASTING

YOU WILL NEED

  • Tepid Water
  • Mixing Bowl
  • Alginate
  • Drill with Squirrel attachment
  • Plaster

METHOD

  1. Mix together the alginate with tepid water until you have a porridge like mixture.
  2. Pour 1/2 of this mixture into the casting receptacle. Then place the body part you wish to cast into the mixtures, in this case. the hand. It is important to remove and bubbles that will be attached to the hand, we need to rub out the areas around and under the nails in particular, rubbing the fingers together to rid ourselves of any bubbles that may cause imperfections.

    Hand in Alginate

    Hand in Alginate

  3. Continue to pour the rest of the Alginate in, until the hand is covered and part of the wrist.Leave a 0.5-1″ gap at the top of the receptacle.
  4. Leave the mixture for about 5minutes until it has gone off, then slowly wiggle your hand and finders until the suction is released. Be careful not to carry out this process too quickly as the suction strength may cause the interior to fold in on itself.image62
  5. Mix up the plaster in a ventilated area, until the consistency of double cream. Pour a thin layer into the mould and rotate around the mould, ensuring the plaster coasts every orifice, then pour this plaster out again.
  6. Pour in another layer of plaster, again coating the whole mould, allow to settle in the bottom, tapping gently to release any bubbles. repeat this process until the mould is filled to the brim and then leave for two hours to set.image63
  7. Once the plaster has set, remove the receptacle and use a blunt wooden tool to carve away the alginate, ensuring the plaster mould is not touched.

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Voila.

Voila.

 

This method is particularly good as it picks up fine details very easily and efficiently. For information on the next step of this process, please look out for my “creating a fiberglass core” post.

Severed Finger and Cut Up Thumb

9 Dec

Again, night time creativeness hits! I missed a couple of lessons recently so I decided to go back to one of them and take a look at the work that was done, using the other student’s blogs as guides – though they are pretty simple to do.

The first trick I took a look at was creating a severed thumb. I think this is really effective for photography but a little harder for video as the finger is just bent down. Overall it looks great – I haven’t edited the pictures at all and  can’t even see the wax edges myself 🙂

Here is a little video of it!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=H6rdthOSwjE

Severed Finger

Severed Finger

Secondly, I looked at creating a split thumb. Again I think this worked pretty well, my only mistake being using scissor edges rather than a smaller one such as a toothpick, the other girls also used Derma Wax rather than Morticians Wax and theirs looked a little more realistic so this is something I should try again.

Cut Finger

Cut Finger

Once I’ve got all my work done for this year (by the end of this week!) I will be looking at a few different gun shots and sticking objects through the skin – glass in the arm, pencil through the foot. That kind of work!